Advertisement

How King Christian IX and Queen Victoria Became Grannies of European Monarchy



In the middle ages, royals did not have much to say about romantic involvement. Their affairs of the hearts were handled by the court ministers who were responsible to scout for royal spouses for the sake of the country.

Royal marriages were considered then as an opportunity to increase political alliances and territorial expansion, so royals needed to marry within royalty.

The tradition continued until the early part of the 20th century, no longer for territorial alliances but for the protection of the prestige and interest of the crown.

Marrying non-aristocratic commoners was rarely heard then. Any royal who will do so often suffer terrible consequences - stripping of titles and inheritance and banishing from the royal court.

Commoners were regarded then as damaging to the prestige of the throne and threatening to the continuation of royal bloodline in the line of succession.

It is through this royal custom that today's royals of Europe are mostly directly descended from Queen Victoria and King Christian IX.

Children of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert

1. Victoria, Princess Royal (1840-1901) married Emperor Frederick III of Germany
2. Edward VII, King of the United Kingdom (1841-1910) married Princess Alexandra of Denmark
3. Princess Alice (1843-1878) married Louis IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine
4. Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh and Saxe Coburg-Gotha (1844-1900) married Grand Duchess Maria of Russia
5. Princess Helena (1846-1923) married Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein
6. Princess Louise  (1848-1939) married John Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll
7. Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn (1850-1842) married Princess Louise of Prussia
8. Leopold, Duke of Albany (1853-1884) married Princess Helena of Waldeck-Pyrmont
9. Princess Beatrice  (1857-1944) married Prince Henry of Battenberg (younger brother of Prince Louis of Battenberg)

Children of King Christian IX and Prince Louise of Hesse-Kassel

1. Frederick VIII, King of Denmark (1843-1912) married Princess Lovisa of Sweden
2. Princess Alexandra (1844-1925) married King Edward VII of the United Kingdom
3. George I, King of Greece (1845-1913) married Grand Duchess Olga Konstantinovna of Russia
4. Princess Dagmar (1847-1928) married Czar Alexander III of Russia
5. Princess Thyra (1953-1833) married Ernest Augustus, Crown Prince of Hanover
6. Prince Valdemar (1858-1939) married Princess Marie of Orleans. Grand parents of Queen Ana of Romania

Here are the European countries whose current rulers are directly descended from Queen Victoria and King Christian IX:

Belgium: King Albert II is the youngest son of King Leopold III, a direct descendant of King Leopold I, the maternal uncle of Queen Victoria. Albert's mother was Queen Astrid, the former Princess Astrid of Sweden, whose mother, Princess Ingeborg, was a daughter of King Frederick VIII of Denmark, the eldest son and successor of King Christian IX of Denmark.

In 1959, King Albert II married an Italian Princess, Paola Ruffo di Calabria whom he met while travelling to Vatican City in 1958 to witness the inauguration of Pope John XX111. Paola is the daughter of Prince Ruffo di Calabria, the 6th Duke of Guardia Lombardia. The tradition of marrying within royalty in Belgium ended in the offspring of King Albert II when two of his three children married non-royals.
King Albert II of Belgium

Denmark: Queen Margrethe II of Denmark is the eldest daughter and successor of King Frederick IX and Queen Ingrid. Frederick IX was the great grandson of King Christian IX, while Queen Ingrid was the daughter of Crown Princess Margaret, a granddaughter of Queen Victoria of Britain through her third son, Prince Arthur, the Duke of Connaught.

Ingrid's brother, Crown Prince Gustav, was the father of the current monarch of Sweden, Carl XVI Gustav. Margrethe has two sisters, Princess Benedikti who married a German Prince and Princess Anna Marie who married King Constantine II). In 1967, Margrethe married a French nobleman, Henri Marie Jean Monpezat whom she had two sons. Unfortunately, their two sons married commoners with no aristocratic background.

Queen Margrethe II of Denmark

Great Britain: Queen Elizabeth's paternal grandfather was King George V, son of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. Edward VII was the successor and eldest son of Queen Victoria, while Alexandra was the eldest daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark (Alexandra was a sister to King Frederick VIII of Denmark, King George I of Greece, Empress Marie of Russia and Princess Thyra).

Queen Elizabeth II married Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, now the Duke of Edinburgh. Prince Philip's father was the seventh child of King George I of Greece and Queen Olga, a Russian Princess. King George I was the younger brother of Queen Alexandra who was elected to become the King of Greece. Philip's mother, Princess Alice of Battenberg, was a great granddaughter of Queen Victoria through her second daughter, Princess Alice, who married Louis IV, the Grandduke of Hesse-Cassel. Elizabeth and Philip have four children.

Same family tree: Queen Elizabeth II of Britain and her husband, Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh are third cousins through Queen Victoria and second cousins once removed through King Christian IX of Denmark. Prince Philip however is more royal than Elizabeth as both his parents were royalty, it is also very interesting to note that Philip has no commoner blood.

Luxembourg: The current ruler of Luxembourg is Grandduke Henri, son of Grandduke Jean and Princess Josephine Charlotte of Belgium, sister of King Albert II of Belgium, their mother was Princess Astrid of Sweden, a great granddaughter of King Christian IX of Denmark. Grandduke Henri married a commoner born in Cuba, Maria Teresa Batista-Falla.

The dignity of marrying within the aristocracy however is being brought back by the Grand duke's son and successor, Prince Guillaume, when he announced his official engagement last April 27, 2012 to marry Countess Stephanie de Lannoy, a granddaughter of Princess Beatrice of Ligne in Belgium.
Grandduke Henri of Luxembourg

Spain: King Juan Carlos is the grandson of Queen Victoria Eugenia, former Princess Victoria of Battenberg, daughter of Princess Beatrice (youngest daughter of Queen Victoria) and Prince Henry of Battenberg, younger brother of Prince Louise of Battenberg, the maternal grandfather of Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh.

Juan Carlos married Princess Sofia of Greece and Denmark, another descendant of Queen Victoria. Sophia's father was King Paul of Greece, son of King Constantine I and his wife, Queen Sophia  (granddaughter of Queen Victoria of Britain through her eldest daughter, Princess Vicky, who married the German Emperor, Frederick III).

King Constantine I was the eldest child of King George I of Greece and Queen Olga. King Paul married Princess Federica of Hanover, herself the granddaughter of Emperor William II of Germany, the eldest son of Princess Vicky and Frederick III. Juan Carlos and Sofia have three children, all married commoners.

King Juan Carlos of Spain and Queen Sofia. Both great great grandchildren of Queen Victoria. Queen Sofia is also a great granddaughter of King Christian IX of Denmark.

Sweden: King Carl XVI Gustaf is a grandson of King Gustav VI of Sweden and Crown Princess Margaret, a granddaughter of Queen Victoria through her third son, Prince Arthur, the Duke of Connaught. Margaret did not live to become a Queen Consort of Sweden, she died before Gustav could ascend the throne.

He remarried to Princess Louise of Battenberg, the maternal uncle of Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. King Carl XVI's mother, Princess Sybilla of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, was also a granddaughter of Queen Victoria through her youngest son, Prince Leopold, the Duke of Albany.

King Gustav VI strongly imposed to his children and grandchildren to marry only fellow royals. Carl waited years before he made up his mind to take a wife. It was only after his grandfather's death that he married Sylvia Sommerlath, a German commoner. Had he declared his intention to marry Sylvia before the King's death, Carl would never become a King of Sweden. Carl and Sylvia have three children, their eldest child, Victoria, who would become the first female monarch of Sweden, married a commoner in 2010.

King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden

Norway: King Harald V is the second cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. Harald V's parents were King Olaf V and Crown Princess Martha of Sweden, sister of Queen Astrid of Sweden. Olaf V was the only son of King Haakon VII (son of King Frederick VIII, eldest son and successor of King Christian IX of Denmark) and Princess Maud (youngest daughter of King Edward VII of Britain and Queen Alexandra), while Martha of Sweden was another great granddaughter of King Christian IX of Denmark.

Martha's parents were Prince Carl of Sweden (son of King Oscar II) and Princess Ingeborg of Denmark (daughter of King Frederick VIII). Martha did not live to become a Queen Consort of Norway because she died from a brain cancer before her husband could ascend the throne.

There was a story circulating in the royal world that Harald would suppose to marry Princess Irene of Greece and Denmark (sister of Queen Sofia of Spain and King Constantine II of Greece), but the arranged marriage did not push through and Harald married a commoner Norwegian, Sonja. Princess Irene never married and now living in Spain with her sister. Harald and Sonja have two children who married commoners.
King Harald V of Norway

Non-reigning Royal Houses (meaning these royal houses were abolished when the countries declared republic or changed its form of government):

Germany: The last German Emperor was William II from the Royal House of Hohenzollern, grandson of Queen Victoria of Britain. He had only one daughter, Princess Viktoria Louise, who married Prince Ernst August of Hanover, nephew of Queen Victoria and grandson of King Christian IX of Denmark.

Since the abolition of the monarchy in 1918, the emperor's descendants were known as Prince and Princess of Prussia, a German State to which the Royal House of Hohenzollern originated. If Germany will be reinstated as a monarchy, the legitimate heir to assume the throne would be Prince Georg of Prussia who married in 2011 to another royalty, Princess Sophie of Isenburg.

Prince Georg of Prussia, a direct descendant of Emperor William II of Germany (grandson of Queen Victoria) and Princess Sophie of Isenburg during their wedding last October 2011. Georg is the eldest heir of the House of Hohenzollern, a ruling family of the former German monarchy.

Greece: The former King of Greece, Constantine II, is the only son of King Paul of Greece and Queen Federica, daughter of Prince Ernst Augustus of Hanover and Princess Viktoria Louise, a daughter of Emperor William II of Germany. Constantine is the younger brother of Queen Sofia of Spain. He married his triple second cousin, Princess Anna Marie of Denmark, younger sister of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark.

Constantine II and Anna Marie are both direct descendants of Queen Victoria of Britain and King Christian IX of Denmark. Constantine II ascended the Greek throne in 1964 upon the death of his father, five years later, in 1969, Constantine was forced to live in exile.

Greece declared republic in 1973 and Constantine was not allowed to return to the country. He lived in London with his family but still carrying the title of King of Greece and his children are carrying the titular dignity of a Prince and Princess as their lifetime courtesy styles.

King Constantine II of Greece and Queen Anna Marie

Hanover: This is a German independent state until the 19th century. All its rulers hold the distinction of being a King. When Queen Anne of Britain died in early 18th century without a direct protestant successor, the British throne passed to Prince George of Hanover, grandson of Princess Elisabeth, daughter of King James I of England.

Since then, Britain and Hanover were governed by one monarch, well, until 1837. Hanover maintained a Salic Law that prohibited women from ascending the Hanoverian throne. In 1837, King William IV of Britain died without a legitimate heir, his niece, Princess Victoria of Kent, inherited the British crown and reigned as Queen Victoria but the Hanoverian crown, due to Salic Law, passed to his uncle, Prince Ernst Augustus, the Duke of Cumberland. Ernst Augustus had only one son, King George V of Hanover, he was deposed in  1866 and his family lived in exile.

The state of Hanover was abolished but George V's descendants still carried the titles of Prince and Princess as their lifetime courtesy styles. George V's eldest son, Prince Ernst Augustus II married Princess Thyra, the youngest daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark. The current Hanoverian royals are descended from them. If Hanover would be revived as a Kingdom, the legitimate heir to assume the throne is Prince Ernst August IV, the second husband of Princess Caroline of Monaco.


King Michael I of Romania and Queen Anna

Romania: The former Romanian King, Michael I, who is now 90 years old, is a great great grandson of Queen Victoria through her second son, Prince Alfred, the Duke of Edinburgh and eventually, the Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Michael's mother was Princess Helena of Greece and Denmark, another granddaughter of King George I of Greece.

Michael also descended from Russian royal family through both sides. His paternal great grandmother was Grandduchess Maria of Russia while his maternal grandmother was Grandduchess Olga of Russia. Michael I is the closest cousin of Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. Michael I ascended the Romanian throne in 1927 to 1930 when his father was forced to abdicate and again in 1940.

In November 1947, he attended the wedding of his cousins, the then Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip, in England but upon his return, he was overthrew by the rebels and was forced to live in exile, but he remained King because he did not abdicate. He went to Greece in 1948 and married his second cousin, Princess Anna of Bourbon-Parma whom he had five daughters.

Princess Anna, who would later known as Queen Anna of the Romanians, is a great granddaughter of King Christian IX of Denmark through his youngest son, Prince Valdemar. King Michael worked as a commercial pilot at the time of his exile in Switzerland. In the 90s, he was allowed to go back to Romania and was urged to run as President, but the King insisted that he would only return as monarch and not as president.

Russia: The last Russian Emperor was Czar Nicholas II who was massacred by the Russian revolutionists in 1917 with his wife, Alexandra, and their five children, at the height of Russian revolution. Nicholas II was the eldest son of Empress Marie, the former Princess Dagmar, daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark.

Nicholas II's wife was the former Princess Alix of Hesse-Cassel, granddaughter of Queen Victoria through her second daughter, Princess Alice. She was known in Russia as Empress Alexandra. The Empress was the youngest sister of Princess Victoria of Hesse-Cassel, the grandmother of Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, husband of Queen Elizabeth II of England.

In 1964, the Duke of Edinburgh was asked if he would love to travel to Russia, his answer still reflected the pain and bitterness on the gruesome killings of his aunt and uncle, "I would love to travel there even if the bastards murdered half of my family". Emperor Nicholas II was also a first cousin of Prince Philip's father, Prince Andrew of Greece, through King Christian IX of Denmark.

King Peter II of Yugoslavia and Queen Alexandra

Yugoslavia: Before 2003, there was a European country named Yugoslavia, but its peace and order was very unstable due to war and political tensions. The country existed in the western part of Balkans and its form of government undergone several refurbishments, from monarchy to republic to communism and socialism and gone back to monarchy then to republic.

This very unstable situation led to its disintegration in 2003 when it was finally divided into several states: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Slovenia Serbia and Montenegro, the name Yugoslavia since then ceased to exist in the map of Europe.

When it was still a monarchy, it was ruled by the Royal House of Karadordevic. Its last monarch was King Peter II whose mother, Queen Maria of Romania, was the great granddaughter of Queen Victoria through her second son, Prince Alfred, the Duke of Edinburgh.

Peter II's wife was Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark, daughter of King Alexander I of Greece (grandson of King George I of Greece). King Alexander himself was a great grandson of Queen Victoria because his mother, Queen Sophia, was Victoria's granddaughter through her eldest daughter, Princess Vicky. Alexandra was a first cousin once removed to Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh.





-->

Post a Comment

0 Comments